#TokyoZones – A Marie Curie Funded Project (2019 – 2021)

Hello and welcome to the official project space for all things related to the #TokyoZones project. #TokyoZones is a European Union (‘Marie Curie’) funded project delivered as part of ‘EventRights’. It is led by place and tourism management, marketing and development academic Dr Mike Duignan, a Senior Lecturer and Programme Director at Coventry University, UK. For the duration of the project will be a Visiting Professor at Waseda University in Tokyo, supported by two PhD researchers: Emily Mace and Alice Brazao.

If you would like to be part of #TokyoZones in some way or find out more information on the project, please email Mike at: Mike.Duignan@coventry.ac.uk.

Follow and contribute to the #TokyoZones project on Twitter with the ‘#TokyoZones‘ hashtag.

 

What is #TokyoZones?

TokyoZones#TokyoZones is a 3 year research project to generate data that will underpin a publication plan between 2019 – 2021. The aim of the project is to: ‘Explore the role of mega-events as a ‘structuring mechanism’ that enable and constrain the (re)configuration of tourism industry-specific organizational fields, specifically related to place and tourism management and development across Tokyo 2020’s project lifecycle’.

#TokyoZones serves to extend Mike and Prof David McGillivray’s work on the Rio 2016 Olympic Games and the #RioZones project. At its heart is a focus on innovation and sustainability aligned to the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Emphasis will be placed on examining ex-ante projections vs. ex-post outcomes across Tokyo and across Japan.

The project will encompass three distinct phases. Phase 1 will look at the ‘planning’ of Tokyo 2020 and take place between June – July, 2019. Phase 2 will look at the ‘live staging’ of Tokyo 2020 and take place between July – August, 2020. Phase 3 will look at the embryonic ‘legacies’ and take place between July – August, 2021. We will take a qualitative, inductive, case study approach. We look at Tokyo 2020 as an ‘event case study’ and the ‘field configuring event’ in question. Tokyo and the Japan provides the geographical, social and economic context. Cross-sectional, planning perspectives will be compared and contrasted with realities of live staging and legacy analysis.

We will use a range of methods: ‘participant observation’ via walking methodologies to inform an embodied and embedded method journeying through the host city and country to collect i) field notes, ii) audio narration, iii) geotagged and time stamped videos and images to capture geographical and chronology of analysis and change processes, iv) video diary via the production of a vlog that will be completed at the end of every day and uploaded to #TokyoZones. This approach will be complemented by a range of other data collection methods: i) elite interviewing, ii) tourist interviews, iii) surveys, iv) social media archival data, v) geotagged videos and photos uploaded to social media and other digital platforms, and vi) utilising reflective vlog data.

#TokyoZones is an ambitious project and will be one of the largest, most significant holistic analysis of place and tourism management, marketing and development in the context of hosting mega-sporting events like the Olympics.

What will #TokyoZones specifically look at?

Across the three years we have 10 seperate but inter-related Research Foci (RF). These are:

  • RF1: TOURIST MOBILITY AND CONNECTING PLACES
  • RF2: SLOW TOURISM AND AUTHENTICITY IN PLACE BRANDING, MARKETING AND DEVELOPMENT
  • RF3: URBAN ZONING
  • RF4: ENTREPRENEURIAL LEVERAGING
  • RF5: SOCIAL TOURISM
  • RF6: OVERTOURISM
  • RF7: ACCESSIBILITY AND UNIVERSAL URBAN DESIGN
  • RF8: LOCAL, STREET FOOD AND DRINK CULTURE AND PRODUCERS REPRESENTATION
  • RF9: TOURIST MOTIVATIONS, INTENTIONS TO VISIT TO – AND BEHAVIOUR IN – THE HOST CITY AND COUNTRY
  • RF10: TECHNOLOGY AND TOURISM AT TOKYO 2020.

We will be inviting over 300 Senior Manager and Policy Maker stakeholders to take part in the study, from i) the International Olympic Committee and other major sporting federations, and ii) Japanese Organizing Committee and across Tokyo and Japan who have an interest in and/or responsibility for place and tourism management, marketing and development. Right through to, iii) key stakeholders operating across Japan’s tourism industry.

Project introduction video

[Introduction video coming soon]. 

 

Hoped for outcomes of #TokyoZones?

Including but not exclusive to:

  • Numerous journal articles;
  • Media interviews;
  • Conference presentations: academic, industry and policy;
  • Utilising findings and implications to inform policy and practice;
  • #TokyoZones feature length film;
  • #TokyoZones blog to analyse all themes and chart the development of the project;
  • Symposium in Tokyo at Waseda University on Phase 1, 2 and 3 findings;
  • Special interest articles via platforms like ‘The Conversation’ for wider and public engagement of findings.

 

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